FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe quits

(FILE) USA FBI DEPUTY DIRECTORAndrew McCabe, the FBI deputy director who has been a target for US President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans as the agency continues its Russia investigation, has resigned.
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Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the White House played no role in his resignation.

“The president wasn’t part of this decision-making process,” she told reporters on Monday.

The New York Times reported that McCabe told friends that he felt pressure from the director of the bureau, Christopher Wray, to step down.

But Trump had publicly attacked him, and wrote on Twitter in December, “How can FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, the man in charge, along with leakin’ James Comey, of the Phony Hillary Clinton investigation (including her 33,000 illegally deleted emails) be given $700,000 for wife’s campaign by Clinton Puppets during investigation?”

There had been speculation that McCabe would step down in March, once he was eligible to receive full retirement benefits. But he has been the target of right-wing media that he is part of the so-called “deep state” undermining the Trump presidency.

McCabe served as interim FBI director after Trump fired James Comey. McCabe returned to his post after Wray was confirmed as the new director.

The Washington Post reported last week that shortly after McCabe was appointed deputy FBI director, Trump asked him who he voted for in the 2016 election.

McCabe’s wife, Jill, was the recipient of $US500,000 from Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe in her bid for a state senate seat. Trump was reportedly upset by McCabe’s wife’s political involvement. McAuliffe is a longtime ally of Trump’s 2016 foe, Hillary Clinton.

The network also said that Trump suggested that McCabe ask his wife how she felt being a loser. She failed to win her campaign for office. McCabe replied, “OK, sir.”

Democrat Seanator Richard Blumenthal called for a “full explanation” of the circumstances of McCabe’s departure.

He said that McCabe “was subject to baseless political attacks levied by President Trump’s sycophantic supporters in an effort to discredit the work of the FBI and the integrity of the Russia investigation.”

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Gold Coast Suns enter new era under Dew

AFL SUNS MAGPIESIt isn’t quite George Orwell’s 1984, but Gold Coast midfielder Jarryd Lyons says the Suns’ penchant for capturing everything on camera will help the side as they begin a new era under rookie coach Stuart Dew.
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Dew, a two-time AFL premiership player and former Sydney assistant coach, is among the first wave of AFL mentors to have graduated from the code’s new accreditation course.

His modern touches can be seen and heard at training courtesy of the music blaring to replicate the game day and the drones hovering overhead capturing every move.

The club is also working with technology partner, Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, on ways to assist the football department and streamline data analysis.

With marquee man Gary Ablett returning to Geelong before Dew arrived on the Gold Coast, Lyons says it is a fresh start for the Suns.

“Stu wasn’t ever there when Gary was, so he really had nothing to do with that, never mentioned it and it made the transition a pretty simple one,” Lyons said.

“He never had a chance to worry about it.”

The Suns finished 17th last season, with Lyons forced to watch his old club finish on top of the ladder and ultimately fall in the grand final to Richmond.

He insists life is good though, with the club’s Orwellian approach to training right up his alley.

“It’s definitely different … I’m into my eighth season now and a lot has changed since I started,” Lyons, who has two seasons to run on his contract, said.

“The key thing is technology; lots of cameras and programs and drones and lots of reviewing.

“Vision review suits me; everyone’s different, but it definitely works for me, but it means there’s definitely no hiding out there.”

Despite the loss of Ablett, Lyons will fight with the likes of Fremantle recruit Lachie Weller, Jarrod Witts, Aaron Hall, David Swallow, Touk Miller and Michael Barlow for time in the engine room.

But the Sandringham Dragons product is yet to miss a training session this preseason and is confident of playing a big role.

“I’m running better and have had more time on the track; personally to not have missed a session so far this preseason is a big thing for me,” he said.

“(With Ablett gone) it’s up to the rest of us, as a group, to step up and fill that void.”

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Spiny crayfish surprises Qld tourists

Lamington spiny crayfishBushwalkers who venture into a unique pocket of world-heritage listed rainforest overlooking the distant surf beaches of the Gold Coast could find themselves face to face with a feisty, hissing local.
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One of ‘s most unusual creatures, the Lamington spiny crayfish, lives there and has been known to startle bushwalkers by confronting them in battle stance, clicking claws and warning hiss.

It is found only in the cool waters and forests of the Gold Coast Hinterland, 1000 metres above sea level – and less than an hour from the tourist strip of Surfers Paradise.

On the edge of the crayfish’s home turf of Lamington National Park is popular guesthouse Binna Burra Lodge, which has been welcoming guests since the 1930s, and is proud of the rare crayfish.

Guest activities supervisor Dean Hogg is a fan: “It’s the most magnificent creature I’ve ever seen.”

“You won’t find this guy anywhere else in and it’s the last thing people expect to find in a rainforest,” he says.

“First you’re startled by their amazing colour and then you’re shocked because you stumble across them on the walking tracks, sometimes a good kilometre away from water. They’re both terrestrial and aquatic.

“They’re also a little feisty and one might stick its claws up at you and have a little hiss just to warn you not to come too close.”

The crayfish can grow up to 30cm long. The bigger they grow, the brighter their colouring. And despite the blue making them stand out in the lush green rainforest, the crayfish are not classed as endangered.

Mr Hogg says the unique local conditions are the perfect environment for the Lamington spiny crayfish to not just survive, but thrive.

“You won’t find these conditions replicated anywhere else, which is why you can only see these creatures here,” he says. “Then when you consider the 220 other species that live in this diverse ecosystem, it’s truly a natural wonder for wildlife and nature enthusiasts.”

In fact, the Gold Coast is home to more than 1300 animal and 1700 plant species.

Lamington National Park is part of the Gondwana Rainforests of , the most extensive subtropical rainforest in the world. Within its 20,000 hectares are 14 types of forest, trees more than 3000 years old, and a remarkable array of birdlife and wildlife, including the spiny crayfish.

Best of all, visitors can see them all for free. Walking tracks, some as short as 5km for a round trip, can be accessed via Binna Burra Lodge, O’Reilly’s Rainforest Retreat and other points of entry surrounding the park’s edge.

Spring and summer are the best times to catch a glimpse of the Lamington spiny crayfish. In cooler months they tend to hibernate and burrow into the banks of creeks.

AAP, in collaboration with the City of Gold Coast and Gold Coast Tourism, is publishing a range of newsworthy content in the lead-up to the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

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Kyrgios on the move in latest ATP rankings

Ten KyrgiosNick Kyrgios is closing in on a career-high ATP ranking after a summer that confirmed a new-found resolve in the 22-year-old’s attitude to tennis.
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As ‘s top-ranked male player, Kyrgios sits at No.14 in the latest ATP rankings.

Kyrgios has improved three places after going into the n Open as the world No.17 where he was beaten in four tight sets in a round of 16 clash against then-world No.3 Grigor Dimitrov.

Kyrgios achieved his best ATP ranking of No.13 in the world at the end of 2016.

He slipped to No.24 during the middle of the 2017 season but will spearhead ‘s Cup tie against Germany this week with renewed confidence after winning the Brisbane International earlier this month.

Bernard Tomic’s slide down the rankings continues, tumbling a further 25 places to No.168.

Matthew Ebden, a first-round n Open winner over world No.16 John Isner, has moved up four places to No.74 to be ‘s second-highest ranked player.

Rafael Nadal has kept his place as world No.1 although the gap has closed between himself and Roger Federer after the Swiss master’s sixth n Open triumph.

Latest top 25 ATP world rankings

1. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 9760

2. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 9605

3. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 4960

4. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 4630

5. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4610

6. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 4060

7. David Goffin, Belgium, 3460

8. Jack Sock, United States, 2880

9. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 2815

10. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 2705

11. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 2620

12. Sam Querrey, United States, 2490

13. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 2470

14. Nick Kyrgios, , 2395

15. Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, 2385

16. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 2320

17. Lucas Pouille, France, 2235

18. John Isner, United States, 2230

19. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 2050

20. Andy Murray, Britain, 1960

21. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, 1925

22. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 1850

23. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, 1845

24. Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, 1810

25. Adrian Mannarino, France, 1705

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Landscaper serial killer charged in Canada

Canada Missing MenCanadian police are hunting through backyard gardens and planters across the Toronto for possible victims of a landscaper accused of killing at least five people and suspected of more slayings.
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Bruce McArthur was charged on Monday with first-degree murder in the deaths of three men, adding to two cases filed earlier.

Toronto Detective Sergeant Hank Idsinga said at a news conference that the dismembered remains of at least three victims were found hidden in the bottom of large planters in the backyard of a Toronto home that McArthur, 66, used as storage for his landscaping business. He said the remains have not been identified.

Police are searching about 30 properties where McArthur worked, Idsinga said, and he urged the man’s customers to contact police.

“We believe there are more remains at some of these properties that we are working to recover,” Idsinga said. “We have seized quite a few planters from around the city and we will continue to do that. There are at least two sites that we do want to excavate where people might be buried.”

McArthur was charged earlier this month with first-degree murder in the presumed deaths of Selim Esen and Andrew Kinsman, both reported missing from Toronto’s gay village area at separate times last year.

Idsinga said McArthur has now also been charged in the deaths of 58-year-old Majeed Kayhan, 50-year-old Soroush Marmudi and 47-year-old Dean Lisowick.

Idsinga said Lisowick was an occupant of the shelter system who had not been reported missing. Police believe he was slain between May 2016 and July 2017.

“It encompasses more than the gay community. It encompasses the City of Toronto,” Idsinga said.

“The city of Toronto has never seen anything like this,” Idsinga said. “It is unprecedented and draining. He’s an alleged serial killer and he’s taken some steps to cover his tracks.”

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400-bed rapid-build prison Hunter Correctional Centre opens at Cessnock

New prison opens at Cessnock | PHOTOS OPEN: Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock and corrections minister David Elliott take a walk through the new prison on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak
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The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Minister for Corrections David Elliott at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock and corrections minister David Elliott take a walk through the new prison on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak

Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock and corrections minister David Elliott take a look through the new prison on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak

Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock speaks at the opening of the new prison on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak

Corrections minister David Elliott and Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock take a walk through the new prison on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Corrections minister David Elliott and Corrective Services NSW Commissioner Peter Severin at the opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Corrections minister David Elliott and Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock take a walk through the new prison on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Corrections minister David Elliott at the opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Corrections minister David Elliott at the opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Hunter Correctional Centre was officially opened on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Corrective Services NSW band performed at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Cessnock MP Clayton Barr, Corrective Services NSW Commissioner Peter Severin, Corrections Minister David Elliott and Hunter Correctional Centre governor Richard Heycock at the opening the centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Corrective Services NSW band performed at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

The Corrective Services NSW band performed at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

A demonstration in one of the dormitory-style accommodation areas at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

A demonstration in one of the dormitory-style accommodation areas at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

A demonstration in one of the dormitory-style accommodation areas at the official opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

Corrective Services NSW Commissioner Peter Severin at the opening of the Hunter Correctional Centre on January 30. Picture: Simone De Peak

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Ireland to hold abortion referendum

Ireland abortion lawsIreland will hold a referendum to liberalise the country’s abortion regime at the end of May, offering voters the first opportunity in 35 years to overhaul some of the world’s strictest laws.
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Abortion has long been a divisive issue in once stridently Catholic Ireland, which has witnessed a wave of social change in recent years. It became the first country in the world to adopt gay marriage by popular vote in 2015.

Voters will be asked if they wish to repeal the eighth amendment of the constitution that was inserted in 1983 and enshrined the equal right to life of the mother and her unborn child, and to instead enable parliament to set the laws.

While not on the ballot paper, Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said on Monday his government would begin drafting legislation in line with the recommendations made by an all-party parliamentary committee last month, which called for terminations with no restrictions to be allowed up to 12 weeks into a pregnancy.

“We already have abortion in Ireland but it’s unsafe, unregulated and unlawful and in my opinion we cannot continue to export our problems and import our solutions,” Varadkar told a news conference, referring to the thousands of women who travel abroad or use abortion pills to end their pregnancies each year.

“I believe that this is a decision about whether we want to continue to stimgatise and criminalise our sisters, our co-workers and our friends or whether we are prepared to take a collective act of leadership to show empathy and compassion,” said Varadkar, who will campaign for the laws to change.

A complete ban on abortion was lifted in Ireland in 2013 when terminations were allowed in cases where the mother’s life was in danger. The debate around that change elicited street protests from both sides and a heated debate is expected in the coming months.

Two opinion polls in recent days found that between 51 per cent and 56 per cent of voters would support a proposal to allow abortion up to 12 weeks into a pregnancy, with just under 30 per cent opposed and the rest undecided.

A date is expected to be finalised in the coming weeks.

“I know this will be a difficult decision for the Irish people to make. It is a very personal and private issue and for most of us it’s not a black and white issue, it is one that is grey,” Varadkar said.

“If it is approved, and I believe it will be approved, it will say that as a country we have come of age.”

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Ex-Tiger worried about steroid charges

JAKE KING COURTFormer Richmond Tigers footballer Jake King is set to make a deal with prosecutors over an alleged extortion attempt amid concerns he could lose his job over new steroid charges.
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The ex-AFL player on Tuesday faced Melbourne Magistrates Court, where his lawyer Geoffrey Steward revealed the 33-year-old has been charged with two new steroid offences.

King also faces charges of extortion, making threats to kill, and threatening to inflict serious injury against Tony Mokdissi in May 2017.

The former forward allegedly threatened to shoot and break Mr Mokdissi’s legs and those of his family if he did not pay King $150,000 within four weeks.

It’s understood Mr Mokdissi is a business partner of King’s former Richmond teammate Tyrone Vickery, who owns Hawthorn East restaurant Fat Monkey.

Mr Steward told the court King is set to make a deal with prosecutors, who will likely withdraw some charges in exchange for a guilty plea to others.

“One doesn’t know what he will be pleading guilty to, if the matter resolves,” he said.

Mr Steward also tried to prevent the media from reporting the new steroid charges amid concerns it would affect King’s post-football career.

“If it’s published and they are subsequently withdrawn, for him to lose his job,” the barrister outlined his concern.

“There’s a real likelihood that those charges could be withdrawn.”

But magistrate Franz Holzer said the charges were in the public interest.

“I emphasise they are no more than allegations,” he said.

Mr Holzer also said it would be illegal for King to be sacked in the current circumstances.

“It would be wholly unreasonable for the consequence of the sort that you suggest, and I would say it would be idiotic,” the magistrate said.

It’s unclear what job Mr Steward was referring to, and the court was not given details about King’s post-footy employment.

He retired from professional football in July 2014 and runs a tattoo parlour in South Melbourne with former bikie Toby Mitchell.

King faces two counts of possessing testosterone on July 5, 2017, according to charge sheets.

He is due to return to court in March.

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Doreen and Allan Goldies are celebrating 65 years of a marriage deeply embedded in travel, love and Wallsend

YOUNG AT HEART: Doreen and Allan are still “as in love as 65 years ago”, their family has said. Picture: supplied.In the day and age of speed dating, relationship apps and quick flings, one Wallsend couple is proving that more than half a century doesn’t take the edge off love.
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Doreen (nee Cohen) and Allan Goldie are celebrating their ‘blue sapphire’ anniversary –65 years together on Wednesday, January 31.

It’s quite impressive when considering research in the UK last year revealed that the average relationship for young adults in 2017 was just 4.2 years.

So how did Doreen and Allan break the millennial relationshiprecord by 60.8 years?

“They have just always had fun around each other,” the Goldies’ daughter, Michelle, revealed. “They travel a lot now that they’re getting older and all the photos they take just have them smiling and laughing their heads off.”

A Wallsend love story spanning 65 years LONG-LASTING: Doreen and Allan’s marriage, and love, has stood the test of time.

Doreen and Allan with their letters of congratulations.

Doreen and Allan.

Doreen and Allan at the at The Great Wall of China, June 9 2017.

Doreen and Allan on their wedding day on January 31, 1953.

On a cruise at the Luxor Temple in Egypt, June 17 2013.

TweetFacebookAlthough the long-standing couple now live in Wangi Wangi, Wallsend featured heavily in their story.

Both born in the Newcastle suburb, they met when Allan was 15 and Doreen was 13.

In the 1940s young adults who were ‘courting’ weren’t allowed to be alone, but Allan found a loophole when they would both sit on the Cohen family porch.

It was on another naughty escape from their guardians that Allan first kissed Doreen on the cheek in the paddocks behind their house.

They were married 6 years later, on January 31, 1953, at the Wallsend Methodist Church.

From there, the family blossomed –the loving couple have welcomed 4 children, 10 grandchildren and (so far) 7 great grandchildren into their family.

Doreen and Allan spend most of their time travelling now, and are partial to relaxing cruises all over the world –only if they’re together however.

“They’re old school, they spend nearly no time apart,” Michelle said. “It’s a wonder they don’t get sick of each other, but I think that’s part of what makes their relationship so special.”

“They hold hands, everything they do they do together. It’s rare that they’re apart, and mum just keeps doting on dad like they’re still dating.

“I suppose you get sick of tired of yourself when you’re doing things, let alone someone else. There’s been less than you could count on one hand the times they’ve done separate things.”

One such occasion was on the eve of a friend’s wedding, when Allan was on the bucks night and Doreen was on the hens evening.

While playing pool, Allan had a cramp in his leg so bad he had to lay down to alleviate, and meanwhile at the hen’s night Doreen was going through a similar struggle.

“The next day we realised they had got a cramp in the same leg at the same time, even though they weren’t together,” Michelle said. “That might give you an indication of how close they are.”

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The next Full Moon brings a lunar eclipse, but is it a Super Blood Blue Moon as well? That depends…

Atotal lunar eclipsewill occur on Wednesday, January 31, and is in the perfect position to see it. But it’s also being called many other lunar things, from a Blood Moon to a Blue Moon and a Super Moon.
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So what is really going to happen on the night?

This is the first time in three years that we have the chance to see a total lunar eclipse from , and the Moon will spend just over three hours passing through Earth’s shadow.

The great thing about lunar eclipses is that they are lovely to watch and no special equipment is needed to see the events unfold.

The steady progression of an eclipse as the Moon drifts into the Earth’s shadow, June 16, 2011. Phil Hart, Author provided

From light to darkAt first we’ll see the Full Moon begin to darken. For Wednesday’s lunar eclipse the shadow will approach from the bottom-right, leaving the top part of the Moon in sunlight.

It takes an hour before the Earth’s shadow crosses the Moon entirely and once the Moon is completely engulfed the period known as totality begins.

Totality brings its own surprise. The Earth’s shadow is not completely black, but has a reddish hue. This has led many cultures, including someIndigenous n communities, to describe a lunar eclipse as a Blood Moon.

Sunlight still manages to reach the Moon but it must first pass through Earth’s atmosphere. This both reddens the light (by scattering away the shorter wavelengths or blue light) and also bends the path of the light, directing it into the shadow.

This week’s lunar eclipse is a fairly deep one and totality will last just over an hour. Thereafter, the Moon will begin to emerge from the shadows, and it will be another hour before we see the brilliance of the Full Moon once more.

How I can see it?The eclipse can be seen by the entire night side of the globe and everyone will experience the event at precisely the same moment. What affects the eclipse timings are local time zones.

For Western , the eclipse occurs in the early evening, within an hour after sunset. The Moon will be low to the eastern horizon at the start of the eclipse but will move higher in the sky and towards the northeast as the eclipse progresses.

For the rest of , the eclipse occurs two to three hours after sunset. The eclipse will begin with the Moon in the northeast and climbing towards the north.

Check in with your local planetarium oramateur astronomy group, as many organisations arehosting eclipse eventsso that you can share the occasion with others.

But if the weather doesn’t cooperate in your local area, you can also follow the eclipse via live streaming bySlooh, theVirtual Telescope, ortimeanddate苏州夜总会招聘

A lunar eclipse over San Francisco Bay in 2014 (note the moons have been enlarged slightly for clarity). John ‘K’/flickr, CC BY-NC-ND

Super Blood Blue MoonIt seems these days that it’s not enough to be treated to a beautiful natural phenomenon like a total lunar eclipse. Instead, I’ve been hearing a lot of hype surrounding this eclipse and the numerous names applied.

It’s true that lunar eclipses can only occur around the time of Full Moon. That’s when the Sun is on one side of the Earth, while the Moon is located on Earth’s opposite side.

Most of the time the Full Moon sits above or below Earth’s shadow and the Moon remains flooded with sunlight. But twice a year, the three bodies fall into line so that Earth casts its shadow on the Moon.

As well as being a Full Moon, eclipses can also be described as a Blood Moon because of the Moon’s reddish appearance, as mentioned previously.

But the descriptions of Super Moon and Blue Moon may not be quite what they seem.

Look to the sky … it’s a Super Moon!

I’ve written before about theSuper Moon sensationand it’s a term that has only taken off in the past seven years.

Back in March 2011, NASA published an article describing a “super full moon”. The precise time of Full Moon that month occurred 59 minutes before perigee, that is, the Moon’s closest approach to Earth as it travels along its elliptical orbit.

As quoted in the article:

It must have seemed a worthwhile curiosity to report on at the time.

Seven years later and the Super Moon craze is now a bit out of hand, with some claiming three Super Moons a year depending on thechosen definition.

As a Super Moon this lunar eclipse is definitely on the outer limits, with the Full Moon occurring 27 hours after perigee and at a distance of more than 360,000km (calculated in the usual way from the centre of Earth to the centre of the Moon).

Considering that it’s alsoquite difficultto tell the difference in both size and brightness between a regular Full Moon and a Super Moon, this one is really pushing the limits of credibility.

Once in a Blue MoonAccording to Philip Hiscock, a folklorist at the Memorial University, USA (now retired), the classic saying “once in a blue moon” is more than 400 years old. It originated as something so absurd it could never actually happen, similar to saying “when pigs fly”.

But it is possible on rare occasions forthe Moon to turn blue.

Intense volcanic activity or smoky forest fires can fill Earth’s atmosphere with dust particles that are slightly larger than usual. As a result, red light is scattered away, giving everything a blue tinge, including the Moon (normally the atmosphere scatters blue light, hencewhy the sky is blue).

But when it comes to this lunar eclipse, it’s not the colour of the Moon but a quirk of our timekeeping that is in play.

What a difference a day makesA Full Moon occurs every 29.5 days, but our months are longer (excluding February). This mismatch of timing means that every couple of years there comes a month with two Full Moons.

In recent times, a Blue Moon has referred to the second full moon of a calendar month. For most of the world, this lunar eclipse is occurring during a Blue Moon, except for ’s eastern states of New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the n Capital Territory.

Those states follow daylight saving, which pushes the Full Moon into the following day and out of the month of January (theactual time of Full Moonis 12:26am AEDT, February 1). This leaves January with only one Full Moon for those states and territory.

But there’s more. This modern definition of Blue Moon arose only 30 years ago.

Theoriginal definitionis as follows: if four Full Moons occur between an equinox and a solstice (for example, in the three months between a spring equinox and a summer solstice) then the third Full Moon should be called a Blue Moon.

This ensured that theproper namesof the Full Moons (common in North America, such as the Harvest Moon) were correct relative to the equinoxes and solstices.

But regardless of the exact flavour of this lunar eclipse, what’s certainly true is that we are part of a grand universe, and Wednesday night is the perfect reminder of that.

Tanya Hill is an Honorary Fellow of the University of Melbourne and Senior Curator (Astronomy), Museums Victoria.This article was originally published onThe Conversation. Read theoriginal article.

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